Thursday, 25 May 2017

Blood heavy metal levels and autism (yet again)

"Data showed that the children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] had significantly (p < 0.001) higher levels of mercury and arsenic and a lower level of cadmium."

And... "It is desirable to continue future research into the relationship between ASD and heavy metal exposure."

Those sentences come from the study by Huamei Li and colleagues [1] continuing a research theme regarding (generally) elevated levels of heavy metals being detected in those on the autism spectrum (see here). Yes, I know that this kind of research is not always met with great appreciation (see here) but the suggestion that the heavy metal burden seems to be quite a bit higher in the autistic population is not something that can just be ignored. More so when it might actually be treatable (with no medical or clinical advice given or intended)...

There are numerous other examples in the peer-reviewed science literature that I could give where the heavy metal burden has been found to be elevated in relation to autism. Indeed, if someone is looking for yet another systematic review and meta-analysis topic, there you go - you're welcome. Personally, I think we've reached the point where the questioning needs to move on to (a) the possible sources of those heavy metals and (b) whether 'exposure amount' is the sole reason for the elevations in relation to autism over and above issues with the biology around 'detoxifying' said metals. Answers are not likely to be simple but questioning has to continue...

To close, he was always my favourite James Bond...

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[1] Li H. et al. Blood Mercury, Arsenic, Cadmium, and Lead in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2017 May 8.

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ResearchBlogging.org Li H, Li H, Li Y, Liu Y, & Zhao Z (2017). Blood Mercury, Arsenic, Cadmium, and Lead in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Biological trace element research PMID: 28480499